Posts Tagged ‘aragonite sand’

The Post – A Short Fiddler Update

March 31, 2008

Just a quick update today – so far many babies continue to survive. It’s still early – we’re just into the third day so far. Looking back at the last batch, I lost them around day 9 or 10. So proceeding cautiously on projections here.

As of this afternoon, I can see that the numbers are lower than initially after birth. To be expected. Some die during molting, the larvae are carnivorous and will eat each other, and some just flat out die. That said, there are still hundreds or thousands of very active larvae swimming around that tank. MANY are clustered in the pockets of the reef rock. They seem to LOVE that reef rock. And another large group is clustered on the aragonite sand surface on the bottom near the heater. Just mystifying.

The water, though cloudy, is clearer today. Water parameters remain as before – dead on target: pH 8.0-8.2, alkalinity and hardness 300 or more, chlorine, nitrites and nitrates all zero. I will retest the salinity later and see if I need to raise it just a bit more or if we are close enough to the 1.020 salinity mark.

I continue to feed the Small Fry liquid food. This time, instead of the Kent’s Marine ZooPlex, I remembered I had frozen mini-krill in the freezer. I ground up a small amount of those and spread those around the tank. It appears many little black dots swim up to the granules of floating ground up mini-krill, then swimming off. So it at least seems like they’re chewing on the krill.

I checked on the “brine shrimp hatchery” – it’s hard because if you turn off the air rock, everything still swirls around and the question in my mind was – “how do you tell swirling brine shrimp eggs apart from hatched tiny brine shrimp?” If I shine the light directly in the bottle, I can’t tell any difference. I noticed though if I looked in the bottle after shining the light indirectly (at an angle toward the floor), I could see shadows of things actively swimming around, as opposed to just eggs spinning in the water. So it seems the shrimp are hatching. I thought tonight I’d take a closer look and may siphon some of the shrimp out for tonight’s crab baby feeding. It will be interesting to see if the babies are up for catching live moving shrimps. They seem able to catch “floating” ground up krill so we’ll keep a good thought.

Till tonight……

The Post – Fiddler Babies Thrive in the “White Cloud.”

March 30, 2008

The white cloud in the babies’ tank continues, yet the water quality is GREAT.

What mystifies me is the absolute ?attraction the fiddler babies have for the aragonite sand and the reef rock. They swarm all over areas of the sand, stirring up clouds of dust, and bouncing down against the aragonite sand, then move on to another area. They are equally attracted to the reef rock, which is nothing more than a hunk of petrified coral.

On the flip side, while they swim by the live rock, they do not seem to be interested in it to any great extent, even though there is a wide variety of algae growing all over it.

The aragonite sand is Seachem’s Meridian Marine Tidal Substrate. The reef rock is “Carib Sea Reef Rock.” Both products help to maintain proper pH and calcium levels, as well as encourage the growth of coralline algae and beneficial bacteria. In fact, I suspect it is the cloud of aragonite dust in the water that may have helped spur the bacteria on, resulting in the nitrite levels in the tank dropping to zero. It just seems counterintuitive to me, to have a tank of water I can barely see through, yet have it be so healthy by the numbers.

I shine the flashlight in the tank and can see thousands of babies swimming around, digging in the sand, or clustering on the reef rock. All are in motion, so they are most definitely alive. I have to wonder if there are already lots of microscopic algae on the surfaces of the sand and the reef rock, and the congregating of the fiddler babies is about eating what’s there.

I am currently feeding them 4 drops of Wardley’s Essentials Small Fry Liquid Food and a 1/4 tsp of Kent Marine’s ZooPlex, 3 times a day. I’m being very careful not to overfeed, and monitoring ammonia and nitrite levels 2-3 times a day.

I’ve also started the live brine shrimp hatchery going, though I have to say, I’m not sure if that’s something I want to deal with on a regular basis. Just one more job I have to do and as one of the sites mentioned, if you can’t get live food, frozen brine shrimp is the next best thing. I know I saw cubes of frozen brine shrimp at PetsMart and I may yet change to that. But for now, I’ll see the “sea monkey” hatching project through and see how it goes. I expect I’ll have hatched brine shrimp by tomorrow so I will try some of that instead of the liquid feeds and see what happens.

Just as an aside, I found a page on About.com that mentions their top picks for “small fry” food.

While these are primarily small fry as in baby fish, they all contain the multitude of nutrients need, and in an accessible, easily digested liquid form for young aquatic creatures. So I’m not too concerned.

Frankly, even though the Kent Marine ZooPlex is supposed to be for larval invertebrates, I have to say I’m more happy with the “dispersal” ability of Wardley’s Small Fry food. Wardley’s is a milky liquid that spreads completely and uniformly through the tank, so the most food and nutrients are available to the most number of critters.

The Kent’s on the other hand, is like ground up bits of brine shrimp in a pink liquid. The instructions say a teaspoon per 50 gallons, and since I’ve only got a 10 gallon tank, I am giving 1/4 tsp of the stuff. However it seems like precious little food, that probably isn’t getting to anywhere near the number of baby fiddlers that are hungry and needing to eat. So at least so far, I’m not that impressed with the Kent Marine ZooPlex and will stick primarily with Wardley’s. From there it’s live or frozen brine shrimp.

I raised the salinity of the aquarium yesterday to 1.017 from 1.012. I’d be happy to get to 1.020, which is close enough to a marine environment. I’ll leave it there for a couple weeks then, and gauge the appropriate time to lower it back down to brackish. I want to match that to the development of the more advanced crab forms from the initial larval stages.

As to the adult crabs – they’re doing fine in the main tank. Admiral Byrd, flush with mating success these days, never stops waving his claw. In fact, yesterday, I no sooner put Scarlett O’Hara back in the main tank, and he was right there saying “hi.” She hid behind the water filter to eat…though not too hidden, he actually lay backwards and slightly upside down on the water heater near her, and waved his claw at her upside down. Talk about “never give up.”

Anyway, so far, so good. We’ll see how this progresses over the next few days. It would be nice to keep many alive to actually make it to adult crab stage. Stay tuned!