Posts Tagged ‘bubbler’

The Gift – A Fiddler Crab Extra From a Fellow Crab Enthusiast

March 18, 2008

One of our readers sent in some information the other day about her attempts to raise fiddler crab larvae. That comment was in response to my blog post entitled:

The Fiddler Babies are Dead But We’ll Start Over and Prove HorseyhannahWrong.

Yesterday Laurie has this update that she posted on one of my other blog posts: “Extra! News on Preparing the Fiddler Crab Nursery.”

She has such good info, and generously wants to share it with all, so I include it here for all to see.

I especially loved what she said toward the end of her comment, that maybe if all of us who have knowledge on the subject of fiddler crabs pool our info, we can prove that you CAN too raise fiddler babies without the hundreds and thousands of dollars of equipment that Horseyhannah (on the Animal Planet forum) says you need.

So here is Laurie’s information, her gift to all fiddler enthusiasts out there, updating us on her progress and also listing the many things she’s done to make this work. Thank’s Laurie! And to anyone else who might have more info for myself or Laurie, please do send your comments. They are welcome!

Fiddler crab lovers of the world, unite!!! 🙂

Comment:
Laurie’s Fiddler Crab fry–March 17th, 2008, Day 7 and still going…

Just an update. They were released on March 10th and true to the (artist!?) breeder of the mangrove crabs www.aquahoito.info/sesarma/index.html on March 15th, day 5, I had a little more than half die off. In the last 2 days no more have died, tho.
Today I was able to get supplies for them, including a salinity meter ($7.00) and some test strips for nitrate/nitrite etc. and Kent’s PhytoPlex (not live) for more food. As I didn’t have proper food for them I did the newborn fish fry trick of feeding them hard boiled egg yolk. About 1/2 a matchstick head’s worth smashed fine in some water and dispersed with the fry, twice a day. That was too much, no doubt, but I’m new at crabs and they did ok…

I tested my water (2 gallon hex w/no filtration, slight bubbling from airstone) and nitrates were 0, nitrites were alright-“caution” .5 ppm, salt is .015ppm, hardness 300 (ideal). I’m finding it’s cheaper to do water changes in a small fry tank than buy a whole salt water filtration system. 2 tbsp Ocean Reef salt/quart, 1 qt every couple days. The little squirts only have to get to 2 or 3 months old before they’re little crabs, by the looks of Mr. Mangrove Crab’s work, so that’s not much salt used over time versus the complexities of a nitrogen cycle filtration system. Now that I have test strips I’ll know how often that should be.

Again, shutting off the bubbler, wiping the bottom to free the slime that’s growing there (I don’t think I’m getting it all, so if it’s food it’s still present somewhat), then fluffing it to one side and siphoning it up w/airline tubing seems to clean the nitrite creating stuff pretty well. Shining a light in one corner for them to aggregate near keeps most of them out of the way, and I shine it again in the gunk glass I siphoned into to get the ones I accidently sucked up back into the tank.

One interesting note is that after the “D-Day” day 5 die off the herd that is left swims less and congregates on the bottom on the side facing the window. Their movement is now more like a thousand little frogs hopping around in the herd at the bottom of the tank. Some still swim, but majority is doing the new movement. I can see a bit of their tail now, but no major growth change.
Possible theories: 1.) they molted on day 5 and many didn’t make it through. 2.)Nitrites killed them at this stage and they haven’t molted yet. 3.) Maybe everyone’s dies at day 5 because they have 5 days of food stored in them or because when they molt the new contact with water conditions isn’t right for them…
Interesting to note that my water isn’t the right ppm for salt, but half have survived… I thought I saw somewhere it should be ocean water (1.020-1.024, and somewhere else 1.010. hmm. Wish I had more tanks to test all 3 salinities.

My hope is that with more postings from folks that are having success we can all help each other out to solve this mystery and not make silly statements like it taking hundreds of thousands of dollars to get the right water conditions for this. heh heh that one still makes me chuckle. I bet it’s possible.

Folks could try their filtration systems in their nursery tanks with a big ball of fiber-fill around the intake (intake on LOW!) with super fine cloth over that. That makes the drag into the intake almost nothing. You’ll see if the babies are being pulled onto it, it’s too strong still… but I still am having great water results with one gallon of water in a two gallon tank.
Best… Laurie

The Post – Odd Goings-On in the Fiddler Tank – Is Scarlett Acting Pregnant Again?

March 16, 2008

When I first I walked by the fiddler tank yesterday morning, I was sleepy and oblivious. Then I did a double-take. Sitting at the front of the tank was the discarded molted shell of somebody. On closer examination, and with my husband’s consultation too, we both agreed it was Melanie Hamilton’s discard. That means she is at the moment most likely to get pregnant if Admiral Byrd invites her in.

At the same time we noticed that Scarlett O’Hara was sitting on top of the water filter….again. The last time she did that, we noticed shortly afterward that she was pregnant.

Admiral Byrd of course, was marching up and down the tank, claw arm held high, and waving.

To continue – Scarlett O’Hara spent the entire day and evening yesterday, on top of the water filter. She is still there this morning. She has never done that before or since, except when she was pregnant. I know she is still alive because she is “blowing bubbles.” Crabs foam sometimes when they’re out of water, to moisten their gills.

Even when I freaked out Admiral Byrd yesterday, and scared Melanie Hamilton out of her live rock because I was cleaning the tank and accidentally bumped the live rock, Scarlett O’Hara didn’t leave the filter perch. She just moved down into the filter for a bit, then climbed back up. Admiral Byrd meanwhile kept trying to climb the heater power cord up to the top of the filter to be near her, but he couldn’t quite do it with that large claw.

Yesterday afternoon we noticed that Melanie Hamilton remained outside the live rock, sitting there on the gravel serenely watching Admiral Byrd flex his claw. Then she spent the rest of the afternoon and evening in his cave lair. This morning she was resting just outside his lair, picking algae off the rock. He was napping inside.

With any luck, we can try the larvae thing again somtime soon?

I am in the middle of re-establishing the nursery tank. I had emptied everything from the original set-up, cleaned out the tank, put down the one inch or so of the calcium-releasing sand, and added the water. Now I did forget to rinse the sand out, so the tank water was cloudy at first, but it has settle out by now. I’m not sure how one effectively rinses sand out anyway without half of it going down the drain. I will say the white sand really makes the inside of the tank bright when the light is on. If we get babies again, it should be much easier to see them in such a bright tank.

I couldn’t decide whether to make the 3 gallons of water I added marine or brackish. I guess I should start brackish because first we’ll have to move the mom, whichever one of them it is, from their tank, which is brackish into this one. I wouldn’t want to shock them. Right now the tank is on the “marine side” of brackish. I’ll adjust the salinity with a bit more water shortly.

The live rock is back in the tank hopefully doing its thing to establish the nitrogen cycle. Both the air filter AND the bubbler are running and so hopefullly the tank environment will establish itself as quickly as possible. Rather than replace the old water filter cartridge and lose whatever nitrogen-fixing bacteria that had started to thrive in it, I left everything in place and returned it to the tank.

An interesting about the old water in that tank. I tested it before I emptied it out just to see if the nitrite levels ever came down. They read zero, and the nitrates were in the “okay” zone. I guess once I stopped using the live phytoplankton and let the water filter run for a few days, that was what it needed. So the phytoplankton was most likely the culprit in the high nitrites. In any event, I dumped the old water and just started with fresh sea/brackish water all over again.

One thing – that Reef Calcium product that I’d hoped would raise the alkalinity but not raise the pH, when added to half strength Instant Ocean… maybe it didn’t raise the pH but it didn’t solve the problem of the pH being too high from the Instant Ocean even when I used that at half strength. So I still had to use a pH lowering solution and this morning it is about 8.0 vs 8.4 that it was yesterday. So that’s perfect . At least though, the Reef Calcium did raise the alkalinity.

I will keep you all posted on any news from the adult tank. Keeping good thoughts for a new crop of larvae babies. Stay tuned.

The Post – The Fiddler Babies are Dead, But We’ll Start Over And Prove Horseyhannah Wrong!!

March 10, 2008

The fiddler babies are dead.

I am sad, because I really did like the fiddler babies. I looked around on the web last night for clues to their demise and that’s when I got ticked.

The Discovery Channel’s Animal Planet Online Forum had a discussion of how to raise fiddler crab larvae. “Horseyhannah,” a senior member on the forum basically told a member who asked how to raise fiddler larvae that it’s so hard and requires hundreds of thousands of dollars of equipment to simulate ocean environments, waves, tides, etc. so it’s really not possible. Horseyhannah told the person to just enjoy the adult fiddler crabs and don’t bother to raise the babies. Needless to say, the person asking the question was polite, said thank you, agreed it will probably be hard, but would still like to know horseyhannah’s info source…just in case she decided to raise them anyway. My answer to that person is: GO FOR IT!!!! PROVE HORSEYHANNAH WRONG!!!!!

In fact, I am determined to do just that. In my book, Horseyhannah has thrown down the gauntlet and I am determined to prove her wrong.

I will concede failure on this first attempt. I am sad as I was so looking forward to having some fiddler grandchildren survive. I was frustrated and disappointed because contrary to the advice above, I think it was not only possible, but it was happening. Because I lost them so quickly, that tells me something overwhelming happened in the tank to kill them all off at once.

To review, by Friday afternoon, there were no babies moving around. It was a rapid decline, and up until that point, we still had quite a large number alive. I have to conclude it was a water quality issue and I think the biggest culprit was the live phytoplankton. But to go through this methodically, let me look at several things. If it were salinity, ie they didn’t like the marine environment I don’t think they would have lived that long in it to start with. I suspect the following things were problems:

1) I used gravel and we did lose MANY babies because they burrowed into the gravel crevices and died there.

2) The nitrite levels in the water spiked suddenly and got very toxic. Thoughts on this point:

a) I didn’t get the tank set up early enough to have a mature and well-functioning nitrogen cycle.

b) I either fed them the wrong food, or too much, or both. The wrong food or too much food meant it didn’t get eaten, sat in the tank and rotted. OR it created a huge algae bloom that raised nitrite levels beyond a tolerable level.

c) I didn’t change the water fast enough once I realized the nitrites were a problem, though given the phytoplankton issue, I was probablly fighting a losing battle from the beginning.

d) I no doubt lost babies doing the water changes because my only option was to bail water out of the tank and pour it down the drain

So boys and girls, what have I learned from this first attempt that can be done better next time?

1) I will use calcium sand not gravel. Aside from the fact that the babies won’t get trapped in the substrate material, the calcium sand will provide enough calcium for the babies to stay healthy during many molts.

2) Figure out the right food and amount. The gentleman from Finland whose article I quoted a few days back (he raised the Red Clayed Mangrove crabs) fed his larval crab Artemia…brine shrimp. He had a hatchery right in the tank to have a fresh supply. He also used something called JBL Nobilfluid for when the larvae were too small for the brine shrimp. This product is probably similar to the Small Fry liquid food I was using. It it made by a company in Germany and I’m trying to find out if it is marketed here. It has 50 different vitamins and minerals as well as brine shrimp and is geared for newly hatched aquatic animals too small to tackle live brine shrimp yet.

3) DON’T USE LIVE PHYTOPLANKTON this time. In spite of an almost 50% water change, I could not get the nitrite levels down. In fact, they kept rising. Now I am finding information that phytoplankton excrete nitrites. The better the phytoplankton did, the higher the nitrites. And with each feeding I basically inoculated the tank with more. I created my very own algae bloom which released such high nitrite levels, the babies were doomed.

Frankly, the tank seemed to be doing okay until I started using the phytoplankton. I would feed the liquid Small Fry food and while the tank would be cloudy initially, it cleared quickly, telling me the babies ate the food. At that point, in spite of it being a new tank with an unestablished nitrogen cycle, the nitrite levels stayed pretty low. However, once I started using the phytoplankton, the tank got cloudy quickly, the nitrite levels spiked, the water had a greenish tint, and the larval crabs numbers dropped dramatically. So, NO phytoplankton.

4) For water changes, instead of bailing water out, I will use the water bubbler as my “filter” to keep the babies in the tank, and let gravity siphon water out of the tube. I have the bubbler’s pump set up beneath the tank and have a regulator valve in the line to keep water from back-flowing from the air bubbler, into the pump. If I remove the valve and let the tube sit in a bucket, it will slowly siphon off water through the bubbler. This should let me slowly get water out for changes, without bailing larval crabs out of the tank and sending them down my kitchen drain.

So. I will start over. Admiral Byrd is doing his part, trying to get Scarlett O’Hara to notice him. Scarlett O’Hara has been eating and hanging around Admiral Byrd’s cave den. I figure it’s only a matter of time before Scarlett has eggs again. Therefore, tomorrow, I will take down the nursery tank, clean it out, get some calcium sand, and get that tank up and running again with the live rock in it, and get that nitrogen cycle stable.

We are going to try this again! My husband and I would love some fiddler grandchildren, 🙂 and even he said that we must prove Horseyhannah wrong!!! Stay tuned.

The Post – My Husband, Alias Fiddler Crab Midwife

February 28, 2008

Again I will note, it is my husband who thought of something crucial. I’d finally gotten the new tank so the water is clear, the nitrites aren’t too high, Scarlett O’Hara is calm and exploring the tank. I got the main tank’s water changed, so it too is in great shape. Feeling satisfied with the world, I commented that now all we need to do is wait for the birth.

My husband turned and said: “I’ve been meaning to ask you something that bothered me. You have the water filter running in the nursery tank. When the microscopic babies are born, won’t they all get sucked into the filter material?”

“OH MY GOD.” The man is right. We’ll come down some morning and Scarlett will have delivered and there’ll be no babies in the tank – just this primal cry of the thousands emitting from the cloth and charcoal filter material – the crab baby equivalent of “Oh the humanity!!”

I first thought maybe I could just pull out the filter material and just leave the water pump running, but again, my engineer husband said, “Well that will be okay I guess while they’re microscopic. But what happens when they start to grow and get a little bigger? They’ll get sucked through the pump and won’t that grind them all up?”

“OH MY GOD again.” You know, for a person who started this whole thing out with “So, we’ve spent $4 on fiddler crabs and a $100 on support gear,” and laughed at the endeavor, he is the one the babies should thank if they make it because he is the one paying such close attention to their every need. When I hedged about spending yet another $30 on a tank heater, he was like, “But won’t they need heat?”

In any event, I ran to Petsmart to buy a tank bubbler. There’s all kinds – wands, rocks, bars, then there’s pumps – all kinds of those, not to mention you have to buy the right pump to handle the volume of your tank and the right sized wand to stretch across your tank, then there’s the check valve you have to install if the pump is going to be below the aquarium instead of above it – keeps the water from backflowing into the pump in case of power loss….you get the picture. I finally settled on a pump for aquariums up to 20 gallons instead of 10. Wanted something with more power to push air in there. And I selected a wand to extend across the back of the tank to create a curtain of bubbles. I thought that might circulate the oxgen better than a bubble rock. It won’t filter the water, but hopefully the huge live rock and the bacteria I’ve already seeded the tank with from the old filter backing, will be enough to jump-start the nitrogen cycle without the filter running. The bubbler will give them fresh air. So, keep your fingers crossed.

At least Scarlett O’Hara seems to like it. She climbs up on the wand and sits there with bubbles flowing up around her. I hope she thinks it’s “surf” and releases the babies soon. My husband wonders if she is scurrying around the tank so much because it’s getting close and she’s frantically trying to find that right spot to let them go and be carried out “into the open ocean.” Sigh.

Truly, those fiddler babies owe him a lot. He is the true fiddler dad. Admiral Byrd may be oblivious and not care, but my husband surely does. It’s that whole “Caring is Catchy,” thing.