Posts Tagged ‘nursery’

The Post – 2010 in review

January 2, 2011

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meterβ„’ reads This blog is doing awesome!.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 5,300 times in 2010. That’s about 13 full 747s.

In 2010, there were 3 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 320 posts. There was 1 picture uploaded, taking a total of 34kb.

The busiest day of the year was August 6th with 66 views. The most popular post that day was The Post – Extra! News on Preparing the Fiddler Crab Nursery.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were en.wordpress.com, google.com, search.aol.com, student-loan-consilidation.com, and mariaozawa2u.blogspot.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for pregnant crab, pregnant fiddler crab, fiddler crab babies, faith is believing when common sense tells you not to, and pregnant crabs.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

The Post – Extra! News on Preparing the Fiddler Crab Nursery February 2008
4 comments

2

The Post – Pregnant Scarlett O’Hara and the Proud Father February 2008
2 comments

3

The Post – Faith is Believing in Something When Common Sense Tells You Not To June 2008

4

The Post – How Long Do Fiddler Crabs Stay Pregnant? February 2008
1 comment

5

The Gift – A Fiddler Crab Extra!! Meet the Babies! March 2008
1 comment

The Post – Scarlett O’Hara’s Moved to the Nursery

March 25, 2008

Yesterday was one week that we noticed Scarlett O’Hara was pregnant again.

Looking back over my notes on the first pregnancy – we noticed her eggs (2/17/08), then moved her about a week later (2/24/08) into the spare tank I’d just set up. Five days later she delivered. (2/29/08) The one thing we weren’t sure the first time was how long she was carrying the eggs before we noticed. From my log notes, I saw her on the 14th and didn’t notice anything. So, I expect it wasn’t much before 2/17 that she brought the eggs out on her abdomen. Given that, it appears it was about a two week gestation period.

If history repeats itself, 2 weeks will be about 3/31/08, next Monday.

With that in mind, I decided to move Scarlett O’Hara to the nursery. She seems calm this time, doesn’t seem disturbed by the calcium sand, sat under the water filter for a while, then moved toward the side of the tank and greedily went after the shrimp pellets I dropped in.

Since I can’t be sure when the eggs will hatch, I will shut off the water filter today.

Yesterday’s water parameters show both the main aquarium and the nursery aquarium to be about equal. No nitrates in the nursery yet, but moving Scarlett into it should kickstart the nitrogen cycle; I did drop in some shrimp pellets into the nursery the other day, just so “something” organic would be “rotting” in there and feed the nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Hopefully that will be enough to do the trick.

Yesterday’s parameters:

Main aquarium (before moving Scarlett):

Salinity 1.0115, Chlorine 0, Alkalinity 300, Hardness >300, Nitrites 0, Nitrates 20, pH 7.8-8.0

Nursery aquarium:

Salinity 1.013, Chlorine 0, Alkalinity 300, Hardness >300, Nitrites 0-0.5, Nitrates 0, pH 8.2

I have brine shrimp eggs though I won’t start hatching those until the fiddler babies are born. According to the package they take about 24-36 hours to hatch. I have something called “San Francisco Bay Brand: Brine Shrimp Hatch Mix” It has eggs, sodium chloride and magnesium sulfate and you just add a liter of water. I have a container with an air bubbler to put the mix in. No heater though. Just not going to spend another $30 or $40 for a brine shrimp heater. The kid at the pet store who has a marine tank and raises brine shrimp for his fish told me there’s no reason you can’t hatch them at room temp. He does it all the time. I’ll let you know how that works. I don’t know how many shrimp I’ll get in one of these packets. There’s three packets to the package. If needed, I’ll go back to the aquarium store and just get the larger container of shrimp eggs.

If you want to see some good instructions on hatching brine shrimp, as well as some pictures of the shrimp as they go from eggs to the tiny shrimps, click here for the San Francisco Bay Brand website.

In any event, I have the Kent Marine “ZooPlex” product to feed the babies for the first few days until the crab larvae are large enough to chase down live brine shrimp. This food is made to work well for invertebrate larvae and is considered a good brine shrimp replacement. It’s available at PetsMart. Again, we’ll see how it goes.

The Gift – A Fiddler Crab Extra From a Fellow Crab Enthusiast

March 18, 2008

One of our readers sent in some information the other day about her attempts to raise fiddler crab larvae. That comment was in response to my blog post entitled:

The Fiddler Babies are Dead But We’ll Start Over and Prove HorseyhannahWrong.

Yesterday Laurie has this update that she posted on one of my other blog posts: “Extra! News on Preparing the Fiddler Crab Nursery.”

She has such good info, and generously wants to share it with all, so I include it here for all to see.

I especially loved what she said toward the end of her comment, that maybe if all of us who have knowledge on the subject of fiddler crabs pool our info, we can prove that you CAN too raise fiddler babies without the hundreds and thousands of dollars of equipment that Horseyhannah (on the Animal Planet forum) says you need.

So here is Laurie’s information, her gift to all fiddler enthusiasts out there, updating us on her progress and also listing the many things she’s done to make this work. Thank’s Laurie! And to anyone else who might have more info for myself or Laurie, please do send your comments. They are welcome!

Fiddler crab lovers of the world, unite!!! πŸ™‚

Comment:
Laurie’s Fiddler Crab fry–March 17th, 2008, Day 7 and still going…

Just an update. They were released on March 10th and true to the (artist!?) breeder of the mangrove crabs www.aquahoito.info/sesarma/index.html on March 15th, day 5, I had a little more than half die off. In the last 2 days no more have died, tho.
Today I was able to get supplies for them, including a salinity meter ($7.00) and some test strips for nitrate/nitrite etc. and Kent’s PhytoPlex (not live) for more food. As I didn’t have proper food for them I did the newborn fish fry trick of feeding them hard boiled egg yolk. About 1/2 a matchstick head’s worth smashed fine in some water and dispersed with the fry, twice a day. That was too much, no doubt, but I’m new at crabs and they did ok…

I tested my water (2 gallon hex w/no filtration, slight bubbling from airstone) and nitrates were 0, nitrites were alright-“caution” .5 ppm, salt is .015ppm, hardness 300 (ideal). I’m finding it’s cheaper to do water changes in a small fry tank than buy a whole salt water filtration system. 2 tbsp Ocean Reef salt/quart, 1 qt every couple days. The little squirts only have to get to 2 or 3 months old before they’re little crabs, by the looks of Mr. Mangrove Crab’s work, so that’s not much salt used over time versus the complexities of a nitrogen cycle filtration system. Now that I have test strips I’ll know how often that should be.

Again, shutting off the bubbler, wiping the bottom to free the slime that’s growing there (I don’t think I’m getting it all, so if it’s food it’s still present somewhat), then fluffing it to one side and siphoning it up w/airline tubing seems to clean the nitrite creating stuff pretty well. Shining a light in one corner for them to aggregate near keeps most of them out of the way, and I shine it again in the gunk glass I siphoned into to get the ones I accidently sucked up back into the tank.

One interesting note is that after the “D-Day” day 5 die off the herd that is left swims less and congregates on the bottom on the side facing the window. Their movement is now more like a thousand little frogs hopping around in the herd at the bottom of the tank. Some still swim, but majority is doing the new movement. I can see a bit of their tail now, but no major growth change.
Possible theories: 1.) they molted on day 5 and many didn’t make it through. 2.)Nitrites killed them at this stage and they haven’t molted yet. 3.) Maybe everyone’s dies at day 5 because they have 5 days of food stored in them or because when they molt the new contact with water conditions isn’t right for them…
Interesting to note that my water isn’t the right ppm for salt, but half have survived… I thought I saw somewhere it should be ocean water (1.020-1.024, and somewhere else 1.010. hmm. Wish I had more tanks to test all 3 salinities.

My hope is that with more postings from folks that are having success we can all help each other out to solve this mystery and not make silly statements like it taking hundreds of thousands of dollars to get the right water conditions for this. heh heh that one still makes me chuckle. I bet it’s possible.

Folks could try their filtration systems in their nursery tanks with a big ball of fiber-fill around the intake (intake on LOW!) with super fine cloth over that. That makes the drag into the intake almost nothing. You’ll see if the babies are being pulled onto it, it’s too strong still… but I still am having great water results with one gallon of water in a two gallon tank.
Best… Laurie

The Post – Scarlett O’Hara, The Pregnancy – Take #2

March 17, 2008

That’s right folks. My husband spotted it this morning. Scarlett O’Hara is pregnant again!! I wondered.

She climbed back down into the tank this morning after almost 3 days up on top of the water filter. Just like last time – spend a few day on top of the water filter, next thing you know, she’s got a bunch of eggs on her abdomen.

I am wondering if there is something about the water filter, maybe the flow of the water up through it as she sits in the currents, that helps the eggs come out onto her abdomen? Does this replicate something about water currents in nature when fiddler crabs “bring out” their eggs?

In any event, knowing that the last time she hung around on the water filter, she was pregnant, we had been watching her closely these last 3 days. She did NOT have any eggs showing Friday, Saturday or Sunday, but there they are on Monday morning.

So we call this day #1 of “Pregnancy, Take 2.” I figured we’ve got about two weeks before she’ll drop the babies again. I’d like that nursery tank to have a full week to just run and establish itself before I move her over to it. Parameters in the nursery tank are good: No chlorine, nitrites, or nitrates. pH is about 8.0, water hardness >300, and alkalinity is running about 200 today. I need to bring the salinity down a bit more. It’s currently at 1.016, and if I can get it to 1.012 before I move Scarlett, that would be great. I don’t want to “shock” her with too big a salinity jump from her current tank to the nursery.

So again, we march through “expectancy.” πŸ™‚

The Post – Odd Goings-On in the Fiddler Tank – Is Scarlett Acting Pregnant Again?

March 16, 2008

When I first I walked by the fiddler tank yesterday morning, I was sleepy and oblivious. Then I did a double-take. Sitting at the front of the tank was the discarded molted shell of somebody. On closer examination, and with my husband’s consultation too, we both agreed it was Melanie Hamilton’s discard. That means she is at the moment most likely to get pregnant if Admiral Byrd invites her in.

At the same time we noticed that Scarlett O’Hara was sitting on top of the water filter….again. The last time she did that, we noticed shortly afterward that she was pregnant.

Admiral Byrd of course, was marching up and down the tank, claw arm held high, and waving.

To continue – Scarlett O’Hara spent the entire day and evening yesterday, on top of the water filter. She is still there this morning. She has never done that before or since, except when she was pregnant. I know she is still alive because she is “blowing bubbles.” Crabs foam sometimes when they’re out of water, to moisten their gills.

Even when I freaked out Admiral Byrd yesterday, and scared Melanie Hamilton out of her live rock because I was cleaning the tank and accidentally bumped the live rock, Scarlett O’Hara didn’t leave the filter perch. She just moved down into the filter for a bit, then climbed back up. Admiral Byrd meanwhile kept trying to climb the heater power cord up to the top of the filter to be near her, but he couldn’t quite do it with that large claw.

Yesterday afternoon we noticed that Melanie Hamilton remained outside the live rock, sitting there on the gravel serenely watching Admiral Byrd flex his claw. Then she spent the rest of the afternoon and evening in his cave lair. This morning she was resting just outside his lair, picking algae off the rock. He was napping inside.

With any luck, we can try the larvae thing again somtime soon?

I am in the middle of re-establishing the nursery tank. I had emptied everything from the original set-up, cleaned out the tank, put down the one inch or so of the calcium-releasing sand, and added the water. Now I did forget to rinse the sand out, so the tank water was cloudy at first, but it has settle out by now. I’m not sure how one effectively rinses sand out anyway without half of it going down the drain. I will say the white sand really makes the inside of the tank bright when the light is on. If we get babies again, it should be much easier to see them in such a bright tank.

I couldn’t decide whether to make the 3 gallons of water I added marine or brackish. I guess I should start brackish because first we’ll have to move the mom, whichever one of them it is, from their tank, which is brackish into this one. I wouldn’t want to shock them. Right now the tank is on the “marine side” of brackish. I’ll adjust the salinity with a bit more water shortly.

The live rock is back in the tank hopefully doing its thing to establish the nitrogen cycle. Both the air filter AND the bubbler are running and so hopefullly the tank environment will establish itself as quickly as possible. Rather than replace the old water filter cartridge and lose whatever nitrogen-fixing bacteria that had started to thrive in it, I left everything in place and returned it to the tank.

An interesting about the old water in that tank. I tested it before I emptied it out just to see if the nitrite levels ever came down. They read zero, and the nitrates were in the “okay” zone. I guess once I stopped using the live phytoplankton and let the water filter run for a few days, that was what it needed. So the phytoplankton was most likely the culprit in the high nitrites. In any event, I dumped the old water and just started with fresh sea/brackish water all over again.

One thing – that Reef Calcium product that I’d hoped would raise the alkalinity but not raise the pH, when added to half strength Instant Ocean… maybe it didn’t raise the pH but it didn’t solve the problem of the pH being too high from the Instant Ocean even when I used that at half strength. So I still had to use a pH lowering solution and this morning it is about 8.0 vs 8.4 that it was yesterday. So that’s perfect . At least though, the Reef Calcium did raise the alkalinity.

I will keep you all posted on any news from the adult tank. Keeping good thoughts for a new crop of larvae babies. Stay tuned.

The Post – Extra!!! We Are Grandparents!!! Scarlett O’Hara Delivers

February 29, 2008

I came out of the gym and my cell phone went off – the vibrating beep to indicate a text message. It apparently came earlier, but given the facility is blocked I only just received it. My husband sent it – a few simple words: We’re grandparents!” I understood immediately – our pregnant fiddler crab, Scarlett O’Hara delivered her thousands of babies.

When I left this morning, she was wandering around, not really interested in eating. Just walking around. Ed noted the same thing before he went upstairs to do some work. When he came down, he said she was just sitting there eating a shrimp pellet … and she was skinny. He did a double-take and noticed the babies were gone from her abdomen, and all these little teeny really teeny black dots, floating around the tank!!!

As soon as I got the text, I raced to PetsMart to pick up the liquid baby fish food called “Small Fry” and raced home. Did you ever notice how many asleep drivers there are on the highway when you’re trying to get home fast?

I quickly got Scarlett out of the nursery tank as my husband reminded me, because at this point, Scarlett’s maternal instincts are probably done. In fact she may view them as floating “cheeseburgers” and start munching. So I moved her back into the main tank. It was like she never left. Not even a second to re-adjust for her. She just walked over to the live rock and started picking off algae and eating. Kind of like “Ahhhh – good to be home.” I don’t think Admiral Byrd has noticed her return yet. Not sure about Melanie Hamilton. She’s been in seclusion since Scarlett O’Hara left the main tank, probably hiding out from Admiral Byrd who has been waving his claw non-stop these days. I expect Melanie may be relieved to have Scarlett back.

Anyway, just had to let you all know she has successfully birthed. I will keep you posted on what happens from here. We’ll see how many, if any, of the babies survive!!! πŸ™‚

The Post – My Husband, Alias Fiddler Crab Midwife

February 28, 2008

Again I will note, it is my husband who thought of something crucial. I’d finally gotten the new tank so the water is clear, the nitrites aren’t too high, Scarlett O’Hara is calm and exploring the tank. I got the main tank’s water changed, so it too is in great shape. Feeling satisfied with the world, I commented that now all we need to do is wait for the birth.

My husband turned and said: “I’ve been meaning to ask you something that bothered me. You have the water filter running in the nursery tank. When the microscopic babies are born, won’t they all get sucked into the filter material?”

“OH MY GOD.” The man is right. We’ll come down some morning and Scarlett will have delivered and there’ll be no babies in the tank – just this primal cry of the thousands emitting from the cloth and charcoal filter material – the crab baby equivalent of “Oh the humanity!!”

I first thought maybe I could just pull out the filter material and just leave the water pump running, but again, my engineer husband said, “Well that will be okay I guess while they’re microscopic. But what happens when they start to grow and get a little bigger? They’ll get sucked through the pump and won’t that grind them all up?”

“OH MY GOD again.” You know, for a person who started this whole thing out with “So, we’ve spent $4 on fiddler crabs and a $100 on support gear,” and laughed at the endeavor, he is the one the babies should thank if they make it because he is the one paying such close attention to their every need. When I hedged about spending yet another $30 on a tank heater, he was like, “But won’t they need heat?”

In any event, I ran to Petsmart to buy a tank bubbler. There’s all kinds – wands, rocks, bars, then there’s pumps – all kinds of those, not to mention you have to buy the right pump to handle the volume of your tank and the right sized wand to stretch across your tank, then there’s the check valve you have to install if the pump is going to be below the aquarium instead of above it – keeps the water from backflowing into the pump in case of power loss….you get the picture. I finally settled on a pump for aquariums up to 20 gallons instead of 10. Wanted something with more power to push air in there. And I selected a wand to extend across the back of the tank to create a curtain of bubbles. I thought that might circulate the oxgen better than a bubble rock. It won’t filter the water, but hopefully the huge live rock and the bacteria I’ve already seeded the tank with from the old filter backing, will be enough to jump-start the nitrogen cycle without the filter running. The bubbler will give them fresh air. So, keep your fingers crossed.

At least Scarlett O’Hara seems to like it. She climbs up on the wand and sits there with bubbles flowing up around her. I hope she thinks it’s “surf” and releases the babies soon. My husband wonders if she is scurrying around the tank so much because it’s getting close and she’s frantically trying to find that right spot to let them go and be carried out “into the open ocean.” Sigh.

Truly, those fiddler babies owe him a lot. He is the true fiddler dad. Admiral Byrd may be oblivious and not care, but my husband surely does. It’s that whole “Caring is Catchy,” thing.

The Post – Nursery Update, Ethics, Parenthood, Friendship, and Just Being a Mere Mortal

February 25, 2008

Just a quick note this morning as I’m on the run. The next installment of my author journey is partially written. Those take me a bit more time. Pondering, reflecting, remembering. Lots to sift through. So those will resume this week.

For now, just to update – Scarlett O’Hara is still alive in the new tank – the “nursery.” Frankly, I was worried. I’d have felt better if I’d set that tank up last week and it had a week to run and settle out. I just hadn’t come to the point of “embracing” trying to raise larval crabs and when I did finally decide this weekend to try, it seemed like birth was imminent. Kind of a go/no-go response needed to be made ASAP.

Last night she just wouldn’t settle down in the new tank. Kept running back and forth, kept trying to climb the sides of the tank. Was there something wrong with the water that was hurting her? All the parameters looked great, in fact the water in the new tank was better than the original – that one’s overdue for a water exchange and the nitrites and nitrates in that tank are rising. So this one is actually healthier. However, certainly there’s other parameters I can’t measure. So my worry was that I’d put her in something I thought was better for her, but maybe I was killing her and couldn’t tell?

I wondered if she was just disoriented and couldn’t find a place to climb out of the water to get air. I noticed air bubbles escaping from her mouth at one point and was afraid she would “drown.” She has this lovely live rock with all kinds of crevices she could hide in, better than her old live rock, AND it’s much bigger so she can climb on top of it, but I thought that maybe in her stress she couldn’t find it. So I scooped extra gravel out of the original tank and put it in the new one and built her two gravel hills so she could walk up the hill and be partly out of water. She found them, but that didn’t seem to be the problem. She just kept running back and forth and climbing the walls.

My husband wondered if she simply couldn’t understand why the sides of this tank were so clean and where was all the microscopic algae she likes to eat? The other tank, though the glass sides look clear, apparently have microscopic algae on them because the crabs are always “picking stuff off” the sides and eating it.

Or maybe she was just so stressed out, she couldn’t relax and would kill herself with exhaustion?

I also noted last night that the formerly clear water in the new tank was now cloudy. I was convinced something awful was taking hold and maybe the live rock had something bad in it. If so, you would expect the nitrites to be rising. I repeated all parameters last night and the water looked good.

So by this point, who is more stressed? Her or me?

My husband said little, just said “It’ll be what it’ll be. You’ve done all you can.” I told him it’s not easy being “God.” He patted my back and said “At least not a God who cares.”

Anyway, I struggled with “should I just bag this whole thing and put her back in the original tank?” I decided not to add any more stress to her by moving her back. One of those – just let it go and see what happens, moments.

This morning the tank looks less cloudy. My husband said he came down and she was sitting quietly in the water, “tending” to her egg mass – ie – giving it pushes and pokes, as if turning them. When I came down, she had found her way to the top of the live rock and was just sitting there on top of her world, soaking up heat from the lights and appearing totally relaxed. (Or is she dead? Should I poke her? πŸ™‚ Just kidding).

All joking aside about my being so worried, I guess I felt guilty. As I said to my husband – Did I put her at risk of dying because I so wanted to try and raise the babies? Did my ego cause harm in this and should I have just left it all alone?

The ethical questions are never clear or easily answered. It’s like being a parent. You try your best, knowing that even when you do, you don’t know if you’ve made the right choices. And in your less than perfect moments, and we all have them, you wonder, will they be okay? Why does God entrust such a big job to mere mortals?

I think Lee Woodruff’s final comments in her book, In An Instant, apply here, at least for being parents, maybe not for being God to fiddler crabs. She worried about how her kids were affected by all the turmoil and intensity when her reporter husband, Bob, was in the hospital with a head injury. She had to be away for long periods to be with him. Things were in an upheaval even though family and friends were looking after things. I so loved her observations, because they are the truth. In thanking her kids she added:

“May you always remember that there are no perfect parents, just mothers and fathers doing the very best they can. And there are no perfect spouses either, just those who love each other enough to stand by “for better or worse.” Don’t be fooled: that kind of endurance is, perhaps, the greatest expression of love.”

I think she could only come to that lesson because of the messiness of life. I think it’s the messy low moments that teach us the most about being human, and about understanding the “human moments” in others. Those times teach us about being compassionate to ourselves and to others, especially when life is at its least pretty. We all want to look like we’ve got it together. Sometimes we do. Sometimes we don’t. Life gets messy. Thomas Moore, a former Catholic monk, in his book, Care of the Soul, I book I read, reread, dog-ear, highlight…in three different colors, quotes something from the Renaissance humanist Erasmus, that applies. Erasmus wrote in his book, The Praise of Folly, that “people are joined in friendship through their foolishness. Community cannot be sustained at too high a level. It thrives in the valleys of the soul rather than in the heights of spirit.”

So, from one very imperfect human, friend, wife, mother, fiddler crab God, go gently into your Monday. It’s really okay, no matter how it goes.

The Post – Is Birth Imminent?

February 24, 2008

I will be returning soon to the evolution of my novel, Under the Pier, but given the goings-on here, I have to take some time to tell of events unfolding in the fiddler crab world.

I decided to see if it is possible to raise at least a few of Scarlett O’Hara’s and Admiral Byrd’s babies, should they survive birth. It’s a long shot, but I want to try. Scarlett looked really pregnant yesterday – that abdomen of hers is large and when she pushes at it, it’s like jelly. I have these observations again from my husband.

It is TRUE LOVE when your husband acts as midwife for your pregnant fiddler crab, keeping close eye on her while I ran out today to get a chunk of live rock for the aquarium. He even called me on my cell phone at the aquarium store to tell me that Scarlett was picking at the larval mass, pulling out a brown thread here and there and planting it in the gravel. He felt birth was getting close and I should hurry home with the live rock. I tell you, is that a friend or not? How many people would call you on your cell phone to let you know your fiddler crab is getting ready to deliver? πŸ™‚

To back up, we went to Petsmart last night and picked up a new 10-gallon aquarium, tank top, light, light bulb, thermometer….. yes, another whole set-up. My husband is laughing but then, he is a geek, just one with different interests, so he respects this endeavor I’m involved in.

In fact, he is working on setting up his own blog that will have all kinds of tweaky things that reflect his interests. When it’s up and running, I’ll be sure to mention it. He finds the most unusual and interesting things out there. To give you a sample of the man, when we are out on a date it is not unusual to walk through the parking lot and have him explain to me the mechanisms for the inner workings of car backup lights and such. I just love it. Going somewhere with him is always interesting and an adventure. Sometime I’ll have to share how he and I hunted down the overgrown boarded up command bunker for a former Nike missile launch site in Newport News VA. πŸ™‚ But a story for another time. Those are the kinds of dates I love. Anyway, I’ll let you know when his geek site is up and running.

To get back to fiddlers, I spent last night setting up the tank. This time I started with distilled water. We have a small water distiller and I proceeded to use up our drinking supply to make up salt water for the “nursery tank.” Mixed up Instant Ocean powder in the distilled water, set up the filter, and within a couple of hours, got the water parameters just about where I wanted them: pH 7.8, alkalinity 180, hardness >300, chlorine, Nitrite, and nitrates all zero. Salinity was about 1.008, a little lower than I wanted because I want this tank’s water to be an almost exact match for the main tank.

This morning I used some marine buffer to bump the pH up to 8.0 and alkalinity closer to 300. Added a bit more Instant Ocean to get the salinity up to 1.010. I seeded the new filter with a strip of “very well colonized” filter material from the old tank to jump start the nitrogen cycle, and brought home from Fish Pros the MOST amazing chunk of live rock – ALREADY had all kinds of marine invertebrates and microscopic algae on it because it had been in another tank that had just been dis-assembled. So, the live rock is well underway growing organisms and probably has another dose of nitrogen-fixing bacteria ready to go.

I debated about what to do with Scarlett O’Hara, leave her in the old tank and struggle with where to release her babies or put her in the new tank with plenty of room for all. Finally decided to take a chance and I’ve moved her into the new tank. She seems to be doing okay in spite of being rattled by being moved. I’m hoping it didn’t disturb her too much. It always shakes them up a bit to move them around. I have done my best to make her a good nursery and here she is free from Admiral Byrd’s claw-waving. I even took the heater from the old tank and gave it to her in the new one. I ordered a new heater for the main tank which should be here Wed. But I figured Melanie Hamilton and Admiral Byrd will be fine for a couple days with the tank lights to keep them warm. I figured “momma” needed it more.

By the way, the tank heater I use is a small one geared for 3 gal aquariums. It’s pre-set and can be mounted sideways with suction cups, and there’s no risk if it touches the gravel. It’s a Marineland Shatterproof Heater (10 watts) part number VTMD10 and found it online at That Pet Place.Β  Since my tanks are only a third full of water (to allow space for the crabs to get out in air), regular heaters won’t work. Not enough water for them to be fully submerged. And regular heaters are generally large and have to be vertical.Β  This guy is short and can be sideways. Keeps the tank in the range of about 78-80 degrees F. So for what it’s worth.

So…the nursery is up and running. So very much hoping that 1) Scarlett will do okay in the new tank; I would feel terrible if she doesn’t make it because of the move 2) the babies do okay.

Then all we have to worry about is how to sell off many many many many many grandchildren? πŸ™‚ I’ll keep you posted.

By the way, if you want to have a few seconds of just staring at some nice marine creatures swimming amidst coral, click on the Instant Ocean link above. Neat intro.