Posts Tagged ‘Small Fry’

The Post – A Short Fiddler Update

March 31, 2008

Just a quick update today – so far many babies continue to survive. It’s still early – we’re just into the third day so far. Looking back at the last batch, I lost them around day 9 or 10. So proceeding cautiously on projections here.

As of this afternoon, I can see that the numbers are lower than initially after birth. To be expected. Some die during molting, the larvae are carnivorous and will eat each other, and some just flat out die. That said, there are still hundreds or thousands of very active larvae swimming around that tank. MANY are clustered in the pockets of the reef rock. They seem to LOVE that reef rock. And another large group is clustered on the aragonite sand surface on the bottom near the heater. Just mystifying.

The water, though cloudy, is clearer today. Water parameters remain as before – dead on target: pH 8.0-8.2, alkalinity and hardness 300 or more, chlorine, nitrites and nitrates all zero. I will retest the salinity later and see if I need to raise it just a bit more or if we are close enough to the 1.020 salinity mark.

I continue to feed the Small Fry liquid food. This time, instead of the Kent’s Marine ZooPlex, I remembered I had frozen mini-krill in the freezer. I ground up a small amount of those and spread those around the tank. It appears many little black dots swim up to the granules of floating ground up mini-krill, then swimming off. So it at least seems like they’re chewing on the krill.

I checked on the “brine shrimp hatchery” – it’s hard because if you turn off the air rock, everything still swirls around and the question in my mind was – “how do you tell swirling brine shrimp eggs apart from hatched tiny brine shrimp?” If I shine the light directly in the bottle, I can’t tell any difference. I noticed though if I looked in the bottle after shining the light indirectly (at an angle toward the floor), I could see shadows of things actively swimming around, as opposed to just eggs spinning in the water. So it seems the shrimp are hatching. I thought tonight I’d take a closer look and may siphon some of the shrimp out for tonight’s crab baby feeding. It will be interesting to see if the babies are up for catching live moving shrimps. They seem able to catch “floating” ground up krill so we’ll keep a good thought.

Till tonight……

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The Post – New Fiddler Babies

March 29, 2008

I was amazed to see babies born before Monday. Monday was 2 weeks to the best of my knowledge. So she delivered a couple of days earlier than I expected.

Anyway, yesterday started with me doing a 30% water change as nitrite levels in the tank since Scarlett has been in there, have been hovering between 0.5 – 1.0 ppm. I kept the water filter running to give the water the best chance of staying nitrite free and letting the nitrogen cycle mature.

This evening though, I noticed that Scarlett was very agitated. She kept running back and forth in the tank, climbing up onto the air bubbler and waving her claws in front of her as if trying to spread something in the water. There did not appear to be anything in front of her though. I noticed that the center of the egg mass seemed to be swelling. Given that, I went ahead and shut off the water filter.

For the next hour or two, Scarlett O’Hara kept moving around, seeming very uncomfortable. Around 8:30 p.m. I looked over at the tank and noticed she was sitting quietly in the front of the tank eating. She seemed “slimmer.” Looking closer, I realized, she no longer had the egg mass. So I missed the delivery again. However, a quick look around the tank and I could seen thousands of tiny little dots swimming around.

I fed them a small amount of Small Fry and ZooPlex. I wondered if this will go okay since I couldn’t get the nitrites to zero before they were born.

This morning I got up and looked at the tank. It was a white cloud. I thought, “Oh God, the water quality got worse with all the babies in there and the nitrites are probably through the roof.” I looked at the ammonia monitor and it is in the safe zone. I shined a light into the white murk and could see thousands of babies swimming around. So they’re still alive and ?healthy.

Wondering why the tank is so cloudy, I decided to recheck water parameters:

pH 8.0 – good; alkalinity 300, hardness >300, chlorine 0 – all great results, AND the REAL KICKER OF ALL: NITRITES AND NITRATES ZERO!!!! Puzzled, I repeated the nitrites test using a tube test instead of the dipstick. Again – nitrites are ZERO!!

So water quality is actually BETTER??? I looked in the tank and saw all the babies flitting around and MANY on the calcium sand at the bottom. That’s when the light bulb went off in my head. The water cloudiness is “white” like the bottom sand….could it be cloudy because thousands of little tiny guys are bouncing around against the sand at the bottom, eating whatever’s in it (since it’s ground up from live coral…possibly some microscopic food bits there?), and eating it for calcium for their molting?

If they were out in the ocean they’d have “bottom stuff” to dig around in so maybe this is a good thing? Though it certainly makes it harder to see them. For whatever reason, baby fiddlers seem to like to “head for the bottom” – at least some of them. That happened last time with many burrowing into the gravel and dying. So I will see how this calcium sand thing goes. I am PLEASED though that the water quality is so good.

For today – I need to go feed them again and I will need to start raising the salinity to ocean level. If that IS what should happen, they should survive. If not, well, we’ll find out. One step at a time.

The Post – The Fiddler Babies are Dead, But We’ll Start Over And Prove Horseyhannah Wrong!!

March 10, 2008

The fiddler babies are dead.

I am sad, because I really did like the fiddler babies. I looked around on the web last night for clues to their demise and that’s when I got ticked.

The Discovery Channel’s Animal Planet Online Forum had a discussion of how to raise fiddler crab larvae. “Horseyhannah,” a senior member on the forum basically told a member who asked how to raise fiddler larvae that it’s so hard and requires hundreds of thousands of dollars of equipment to simulate ocean environments, waves, tides, etc. so it’s really not possible. Horseyhannah told the person to just enjoy the adult fiddler crabs and don’t bother to raise the babies. Needless to say, the person asking the question was polite, said thank you, agreed it will probably be hard, but would still like to know horseyhannah’s info source…just in case she decided to raise them anyway. My answer to that person is: GO FOR IT!!!! PROVE HORSEYHANNAH WRONG!!!!!

In fact, I am determined to do just that. In my book, Horseyhannah has thrown down the gauntlet and I am determined to prove her wrong.

I will concede failure on this first attempt. I am sad as I was so looking forward to having some fiddler grandchildren survive. I was frustrated and disappointed because contrary to the advice above, I think it was not only possible, but it was happening. Because I lost them so quickly, that tells me something overwhelming happened in the tank to kill them all off at once.

To review, by Friday afternoon, there were no babies moving around. It was a rapid decline, and up until that point, we still had quite a large number alive. I have to conclude it was a water quality issue and I think the biggest culprit was the live phytoplankton. But to go through this methodically, let me look at several things. If it were salinity, ie they didn’t like the marine environment I don’t think they would have lived that long in it to start with. I suspect the following things were problems:

1) I used gravel and we did lose MANY babies because they burrowed into the gravel crevices and died there.

2) The nitrite levels in the water spiked suddenly and got very toxic. Thoughts on this point:

a) I didn’t get the tank set up early enough to have a mature and well-functioning nitrogen cycle.

b) I either fed them the wrong food, or too much, or both. The wrong food or too much food meant it didn’t get eaten, sat in the tank and rotted. OR it created a huge algae bloom that raised nitrite levels beyond a tolerable level.

c) I didn’t change the water fast enough once I realized the nitrites were a problem, though given the phytoplankton issue, I was probablly fighting a losing battle from the beginning.

d) I no doubt lost babies doing the water changes because my only option was to bail water out of the tank and pour it down the drain

So boys and girls, what have I learned from this first attempt that can be done better next time?

1) I will use calcium sand not gravel. Aside from the fact that the babies won’t get trapped in the substrate material, the calcium sand will provide enough calcium for the babies to stay healthy during many molts.

2) Figure out the right food and amount. The gentleman from Finland whose article I quoted a few days back (he raised the Red Clayed Mangrove crabs) fed his larval crab Artemia…brine shrimp. He had a hatchery right in the tank to have a fresh supply. He also used something called JBL Nobilfluid for when the larvae were too small for the brine shrimp. This product is probably similar to the Small Fry liquid food I was using. It it made by a company in Germany and I’m trying to find out if it is marketed here. It has 50 different vitamins and minerals as well as brine shrimp and is geared for newly hatched aquatic animals too small to tackle live brine shrimp yet.

3) DON’T USE LIVE PHYTOPLANKTON this time. In spite of an almost 50% water change, I could not get the nitrite levels down. In fact, they kept rising. Now I am finding information that phytoplankton excrete nitrites. The better the phytoplankton did, the higher the nitrites. And with each feeding I basically inoculated the tank with more. I created my very own algae bloom which released such high nitrite levels, the babies were doomed.

Frankly, the tank seemed to be doing okay until I started using the phytoplankton. I would feed the liquid Small Fry food and while the tank would be cloudy initially, it cleared quickly, telling me the babies ate the food. At that point, in spite of it being a new tank with an unestablished nitrogen cycle, the nitrite levels stayed pretty low. However, once I started using the phytoplankton, the tank got cloudy quickly, the nitrite levels spiked, the water had a greenish tint, and the larval crabs numbers dropped dramatically. So, NO phytoplankton.

4) For water changes, instead of bailing water out, I will use the water bubbler as my “filter” to keep the babies in the tank, and let gravity siphon water out of the tube. I have the bubbler’s pump set up beneath the tank and have a regulator valve in the line to keep water from back-flowing from the air bubbler, into the pump. If I remove the valve and let the tube sit in a bucket, it will slowly siphon off water through the bubbler. This should let me slowly get water out for changes, without bailing larval crabs out of the tank and sending them down my kitchen drain.

So. I will start over. Admiral Byrd is doing his part, trying to get Scarlett O’Hara to notice him. Scarlett O’Hara has been eating and hanging around Admiral Byrd’s cave den. I figure it’s only a matter of time before Scarlett has eggs again. Therefore, tomorrow, I will take down the nursery tank, clean it out, get some calcium sand, and get that tank up and running again with the live rock in it, and get that nitrogen cycle stable.

We are going to try this again! My husband and I would love some fiddler grandchildren, 🙂 and even he said that we must prove Horseyhannah wrong!!! Stay tuned.

The Post – A Fiddler Update – Water Issues and Decreased Numbers

March 7, 2008

I am not sure that things in the nursery tank are going well. A sudden reversal in fortunes over the last day or so. Very decreased numbers of babies. In fact, this morning, it’s hard to tell if there are any left. The water got cloudy, like an algae bloom, and the nitrites spiked high and even a touch of chlorine showed on the dipstick, odd since I use distilled water. So the chlorine is coming from tank conditions, not the water I used. Some thoughts:

I am not sure if the decrease in numbers is:

1) Normal? They cannibalize each other.
2) High nitrites?
3) Touch of chlorine?
4) Wrong food?
5) Too much or not enough food?
6) Salinity? Are the science articles wrong and should I have left it brackish?

Water quality:

It started out that the water would get cloudy for a little while after I put food in the tank. Then it would return to being clear. Now, however, it’s cloudy all the time. I replaced 1 gallon of water last night (still “marine” at 1.019), and I added buffer to raise alkalinity for them to have enough calcium to molt. I also added Prime to get rid of chlorine and decrease nitrites. I succeeded with raising the alkalinity, and eliminating the chlorine. Nitrates are still in the “okay” zone, but nitrites didn’t drop.

This morning the tank is still cloudy. I will recheck parameters in a little while, and probably replace another gallon of water. I hate to do that because if there are babies left, I am most likely pouring some of them down the drain with water I tank from the tank. I do pull the water from the side of the tank where the babies did not hang out much, but still. Nothing to be done there though. a.m.

It occurred to me this morning that maybe the phytoplankton was either a bad idea or I just gave too much. The phytoplankton is alive. I noticed the water I drew off last night had a greenish tint. That means the phytoplankton, which is PLANT plankton, and alive, may be blossoming, in fact, maybe it’s a phytoplankton bloom in the tank. Given it’s not the open ocean, but a closed environment, the bloom, while successful in generating more food for the babies, maybe too much of a good thing in an aquarium. If too much growth, is it raising the nitrites and killing off the babies? I am wondering if I should have left the food at “Small Fry” and maybe the ground up krill and not added the phytoplankton.

I will also put a sample of the water under my “precision” microscope later to see if in fact the water is jammed with plant cells.

I will update on the results of water change, microscope viewing, and repeated parameters later, as well as whether it looks like there’s any babies left.

Live and learn. As my husband says, “Next time”….I think there’s always things we can do better. AND, once this experiment is over, we’re going to leave that spare tank up and running empty so it can settle out with a matured nitrogen cycle. Stay tuned for updates.

The Post – Extra!!! We Are Grandparents!!! Scarlett O’Hara Delivers

February 29, 2008

I came out of the gym and my cell phone went off – the vibrating beep to indicate a text message. It apparently came earlier, but given the facility is blocked I only just received it. My husband sent it – a few simple words: We’re grandparents!” I understood immediately – our pregnant fiddler crab, Scarlett O’Hara delivered her thousands of babies.

When I left this morning, she was wandering around, not really interested in eating. Just walking around. Ed noted the same thing before he went upstairs to do some work. When he came down, he said she was just sitting there eating a shrimp pellet … and she was skinny. He did a double-take and noticed the babies were gone from her abdomen, and all these little teeny really teeny black dots, floating around the tank!!!

As soon as I got the text, I raced to PetsMart to pick up the liquid baby fish food called “Small Fry” and raced home. Did you ever notice how many asleep drivers there are on the highway when you’re trying to get home fast?

I quickly got Scarlett out of the nursery tank as my husband reminded me, because at this point, Scarlett’s maternal instincts are probably done. In fact she may view them as floating “cheeseburgers” and start munching. So I moved her back into the main tank. It was like she never left. Not even a second to re-adjust for her. She just walked over to the live rock and started picking off algae and eating. Kind of like “Ahhhh – good to be home.” I don’t think Admiral Byrd has noticed her return yet. Not sure about Melanie Hamilton. She’s been in seclusion since Scarlett O’Hara left the main tank, probably hiding out from Admiral Byrd who has been waving his claw non-stop these days. I expect Melanie may be relieved to have Scarlett back.

Anyway, just had to let you all know she has successfully birthed. I will keep you posted on what happens from here. We’ll see how many, if any, of the babies survive!!! 🙂